Status, biology, and management of ferruginous hawks a review by Richard R. Olendorff

Cover of: Status, biology, and management of ferruginous hawks | Richard R. Olendorff

Published by U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, Raptor Research and Technical Assistance Center in Boise, Idaho (3948 Development Ave., Boise 83705) .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • Hawks -- United States,
  • Hawks -- Habitat -- United States,
  • Wildlife management -- United States

Edition Notes

Book details

StatementRichard R. Olendorff
ContributionsRaptor Research and Technical Assistance Center (U.S.)
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Paginationvi, 84 p.
Number of Pages84
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL13617358M
OCLC/WorldCa31386389

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Status, Biology, and Management of Ferruginous Hawks: A Review,Raptor Research and Technical Assistance Center, Boise, Idaho - Special Report, 84 pages. Paperback – January 1, by R. Olendorff (Author)Author: R. Olendorff. Twenty-seven recommendations are presented, supported by reviews of population status, nesting chronology, nest site characteristics, food habits, and spatial considerations.

This is followed by discussion of the impacts of human activities on the ferruginous hawk, such as urbanization, cultivation, grazing, land conversion, poisoning and small mammal control, mining, fire and fire management. Get this from a library. Status, biology, and management of ferruginous hawks: a review.

[Richard R Olendorff; Raptor Research and Technical Assistance Center (U.S.)]. Status, biology, and management of ferruginous hawks: A Review. U.S.D.I., Bureau of Land Management, Raptor Research and Technical Assistance Center, Boise, Idaho, USA.

84 pp. Ng, J., M.D. Giovanni, M.J. Bechard, J.K. Schmutz and P. Pyle. Ferruginous hawk (Buteo regalis) The Birds of North America Online (A. Poole, Ed.). Status, Biology, and Management of Ferruginous Hawks: A Review.

By United States Bureau of Land Management. Abstract. The purpose of this paper is to promote the wise management of ferruginous hawk habitat to enable the species to maintain or increase its population levels.

Twenty-seven recommendations are presented, supported by reviews of Author: United States Bureau of Land Management. Status, biology, and management of Ferruginous Hawks: a review.

Raptor Res. and Tech. Asst. Cen., Special Report. U.S. Dept. Interior, Bureau of Land Management, Boise, Idaho. 84 pp. Saunders, E. the prairies. The Ferruginous Hawk now occupies only parts of the southern 60% of the range it occupied around (Schmutz ).

This report summarizes historical and recent information on the Ferruginous Hawk in Alberta as a step in updating the status of the species in the province.

HABITAT The Ferruginous Hawk is frequently described. ferruginous hawk is also classified as a Management Indicator Species (MIS) on two national forests in Region 2. Management of a sensitive species and MIS, such as the ferruginous hawk, requires a thorough knowledge of its biology and ecology to adequately address threats to its conservation and successful management.

Status, biology, and management of ferruginous hawks: A Review. U.S.D.I., Bureau of Land Management, Raptor Research and Technical Assistance Center, Boise, Idaho, USA.

84 biology. Ng, J. M.D. Giovanni, M.J. Bechard, J.K. Schmutz and P. Pyle. Ferruginous hawk (Buteo regalis) The Birds of North America Online (A.

Poole, Ed.). ferruginous hawk now occupies only part of the range it occupied around This report summarizes historical and recent information on the ferruginous hawk in Alberta as a step in updating the status of the species in the province.

HABITAT The ferruginous hawk is frequently described as a hawk of the “open country”. The range of the. Olendorff, R.

Status, biology, and management of ferruginous hawks: a review. Raptor Research and Technical Assistance Center. Special Report, U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management.

Migration and winter ranges of ferruginous hawks from Washington. Annual Report. Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. Olendorff, R. Status, biology and management of Ferruginous Hawks: a review.

Raptor Research and Tech. Assist. Center, Special Report of the Bureau of Land Manag., Boise, ID. Powers, L.R. Nesting behavior of the Ferruginous hawk (Buteo regalis). Ph.D. dissertation, Idaho State Univ., Pocatello.

Raynor, G. Found in prairies, deserts, and open range of the West, the regal Ferruginous Hawk hunts from a lone tree, rock outcrop, or from high in the sky.

This largest of North American hawks really is regal—its species name is regalis —with a unique gray head, rich, rusty (ferruginous) shoulders and legs, and gleaming white underparts. A rarer dark-morph is reddish-chocolate in color. The Ferruginous Hawk (Buteo regalis; French: Buse rouilleuse) is a large, open country, diurnal raptor that occurs in western North America.

In many respects, the Ferruginous Hawk is similar to the Golden Eagle. The Ferruginous Hawk has broad, long wings with rounded tips and a fan-shaped tail. Two colour phases occur; a more common pale phase in which hawks have brown upper parts (with.

The ferruginous hawk (ferruginous = from Latin ferrum – iron, ferrugin- iron rust, iron-rust color – reddish-brown), Buteo regalis (Latin, royal hawk), is a large bird of prey and belongs to the broad-winged buteo old colloquial name is ferrugineous rough-leg, due to its similarity to the closely related rough-legged hawk (B.

lagopus). In book: The Effects of Management Practices on Grassland Birds, Chapter: Chapter N, Publisher: U.S. Geological Survey, pp pages Keys to Ferruginous Hawk (Buteo regalis) management are.

Krider's Red-tailed Hawk (B. jamaicensis) is brown, not rust, has white feathers on the legs, dark shoulder patches, and a dark band across the dark phase Ferruginous Hawk differs from the dark phase Rough-legged Hawk (B. lagopus) by the absence of dark tail bands in the re Ferruginous Hawks resemble the Great Plains form of the Red-tailed Hawk, but have larger white.

management and current status of endangered species). ferruginous hawk, rough-legged hawk, golden eagle, crested caracara, American kestrel, merlin, aplomado [Harris' hawk's] breeding biology is the tendency for simultaneous polyandry that it often exhibits.'' Whoa.

Give this book an "R". Ferruginous hawks generally nest within a short distance of their food supply. Most ferruginous hawk nesting studies report a preference for tree nests [16,20,27].

However, ferruginous hawks will use a wide variety of sites, including riverbed mounds, cutbanks, small hills. Online shopping from a great selection at Books Store.

Skip to main content Hello, Sign in. Account Books on hawks and owls: An annotated bibliography (Proceedings of the Western Foundation of Vertebrate Zoology) biology, and management of ferruginous hawks a review (SuDoc I F 41/3) by Richard R.

Olendorff | Jan 1, Status, biology, and management of ferruginous hawks: A review. Raptor Research and Technological Assistance Center Special Report.

United States Department of Interior, Bureau of Land Management. Ferruginous Hawks help to keep the rodent population in check. Economic Importance for Humans: Negative.

Ferruginous Hawks may be a problem for farmers, as they will occasionally prey upon chickens. Conservation Status. Human agriculture and overgrazing have caused a great deal of disturbance in this hawk's nesting habitat. In some areas, numbers of Ferruginous Hawks closely reflect cycles in rodent or jackrabbit populations (Howard and WolfeWoffinden and MurphySmith et al.

This species usually hunts by flying low over the ground, but sometimes prey (e.g., ground squirrels) is pursued on foot. Status, biology, and management of Ferruginous. Ferruginous Hawks were petitioned for listing under the federal Endangered Species Act in but rejected; currently they are listed as a Category 2 Species by the U.S.

Fish and Wildlife Service and as a Sensitive Species by the Bureau of Land Management 1. They are listed as vulnerable in Canada. Distribution and Status The ferruginous hawk (Buteo regatis), the largest North American Buteo or soaring hawk, is associated with open, dry grassland and shrubsteppe habitats in the western US.

and southern Canada (BendireCameronBentBrown and Amadon ). Slightly larger than red-tailed hawks (B. iamaicensis).

ferruginous. Ferruginous hawks in Montana with special emphasis placed on delineation of suitable habitats for surveys generated through a statewide GIS. Raptor Res. 29(1) nesting ferruginous hawks in grassland ecosystems Rosamonde R. Cook, Jean-Luc E.

Cartron, and Paul J. Polechla, Jr. Abstract The influence of prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) on the population status and ecology of nesting ferruginous hawks (Buteo regalis) has been poorly documented. Based on aerial. Ferruginous Hawks are found only in the western United State and Canada, but some winter just south of the U.S.

border on the remaining large prairie dog towns near Janos, Mexico. In image #2, by Bonnie Long, when viewed from the back, the rusty-colored shoulder patches, pale head, and tail that is whitish near the base and rusty near tip, make. As natural environments become increasingly modified by humans, land managers should devise plans to protect sensitive species from human activities that disturb these species.

We explored behavioral responses of nesting ferruginous hawks (Buteo regalis) to an approaching human in areas where the level of human activity on the landscaped varied.

Contrary to other reports, hawks were aggressive. Decline of the Ferruginous Hawk in Saskatchewan. American Birds Bechard, M.J.

Food supply and the occurrence of brood reduction in Swainson's Hawks. Wilson Bulletin Houston, C.S., and M.J. Bechard.

Trees and the Red-tailed Hawk in southern Saskatchewan. Blue Jay Bechard, M.J. Further evidence. from TIN- (January ) Filing Code FISH & WILbLIFE REFERENCE LIBRARY Date Issued December S. WAMOff OF TM TECHNICAL NOTE Robert E. Willis U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR - BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT HABITAT MANAGEMENT SERIES FOR UNIQUE OR ENDANGERED SPECIES by Carol Snow, Research Biologist Conservation Library Denver Public Library Report No.

13 Ferruginous Hawk. Status, biology, and management of ferruginous hawks: a review Boise: Raptor Research and Technical Assistance Center, Bureau of Land Management; White CM, Thurow TL. The ferruginous hawk (ferruginous = from Latin ferrum – iron, ferrugin- iron rust, iron-rust color – reddish-brown), Buteo regalis (Latin, royal hawk), is a large bird of prey and belongs to the broad-winged buteo old colloquial name is ferrugineous rough-leg, due to its similarity to the closely related rough-legged hawk (B.

lagopus). This species is a large, broad-winged hawk. I examined band recoveries and returns to determine differences in crossover, dispersal, and winter distribution of presumed eastern and western subpopulations of the Ferruginous Hawk (Buteo regalis).

Only % of eastern banded hawks were recovered west of the continental divide, while % of western banded hawks were found east of the divide, for an overall crossover proportion of %. Free Online Library: Distribution and nesting success of ferruginous hawks and Swainson's hawks on an agricultural landscape in the great plains.(Report) by "Southwestern Naturalist"; Biological sciences Grasslands Protection and preservation Hawks Livestock Nest building Environmental aspects Behavior Wildlife conservation.

In view of such declines, ferruginous hawks are currently listed as "sensitive" by the United States Bureau of Land Management and as a species of concern in several states. The Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada categorized ferruginous hawks as threatened invulnerable inand as threatened again in Schmutz, J.

Ferruginous and Swainson's hawk abundance and distribution in relation to land use in southeastern Alberta. Journal of Wildlife Management Schmutz, J.

Ferruginous hawk and Swainson's hawk abundance and distribution in relation to land use in southeastern Alberta. Wildl. Manage. Schmutz. Proceedings of workshop on management of southern forests for nongame birds. U.S. Forest Service General Technical Report SE, Washington, D.C., USA.

Symposia and Proceedings, complete volume not part of a numbered series. Breeding ecology of ferruginous hawks, Swainson’s hawks, and northern harriers in south-central North Dakota.

Presented to South Dakota Department of Game, Fish and Parks, Huron, SD. The ferruginous hawk (ferruginous = from Latin ferrum – iron, ferrugin- iron rust, iron-rust color – reddish-brown), Buteo regalis (Latin, royal hawk), is a large bird of prey and belongs to the broad-winged buteo hawks.

An old colloquial name is ferrugineous rough-leg, due to its similarity to the closely related rough-legged hawk (B. Harris's hawk (Parabuteo unicinctus), formerly known as the bay-winged hawk or dusky hawk, and known in Latin America as peuco, is a medium-large bird of prey that breeds from the southwestern United States south to Chile, central Argentina, and are sometimes reported at large in Western Europe, especially Britain, but it is a popular species in falconry and these records almost.The Department of Biological Sciences offers a comprehensive undergraduate and graduate education that spans the breadth of the contemporary biological sciences and prepares students for real world careers.

It has award winning professors who combine an enthusiasm for classroom teaching with cutting edge research.

Graduate degrees in Biology or Raptor Biology are offered, and students work.Management and Conservation Article Demography of Ferruginous Hawks Breeding in Western Canada JOSEF K.

SCHMUTZ,1 Centre for Studies in Agriculture, Law, and the Environment, University of Saskatchewan, 51 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A8, Canada D. T. TYLER FLOCKHART, Department of Biology, University of Saskatchewan, Science Place, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5E2.

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